An introduction and a comparison of the two most dominating city states in greece athens and sparta

an introduction and a comparison of the two most dominating city states in greece athens and sparta The city-states which sided with sparta increasingly perceived athens as a bully and a tyrant, while those cities which sided with athens viewed sparta and her allies with growing distrust the tension between these two parties eventually erupted in what has become known as the peloponnesian wars.

The differences are what set the two apart, while the things they shared in common are what united them as greek city-states sparta and athens shared similarities and differences in their systems of government, militaristic focuses, judgment and views of women. Sparta was one of the most important greek city-states throughout the archaic and classical periods and was famous for its military prowess the professional and well-trained spartan hoplites with their distinctive red cloaks, long hair, and lambda-emblazoned shields were probably the best and most feared fighters in greece, fighting with distinction at such key battles as thermopylae and. 2500 years ago, war broke out in the eastern mediterranean between two powerful states, athens and sparta it convulsed the region, and destroyed an empire at the outset of war, greece was made up of precarious alliances of self-ruling city-states.

During the 5th century bc, greece was dominated by two main powers: democratic athens and the military oligarchy of sparta these city-states were very different. - the ancient civilization of greece contained many different city-states two of these city-states were sparta and athens sparta and athens were different in their values, politics, and societies sparta was focused on their military, discipline, and to have a strong state. The differences between athens and sparta eventually led to war between the two city-states known as the peloponnesian war (431-404 bce), both sparta and athens gathered allies and fought on and off for decades because no single city-state was strong enough to conquer the others. Classical civilization in the eastern mediterranean: persia and greece outline i introduction iii the political character of classical greece a introduction a coalition of city-states led by athens and sparta defeated two persian.

- differences between athens and sparta athens and sparta are two city-states in ancient greece athens had a busy port, ships passed the land at the agora, you could hear people arguing and chatting, you can also see people with their slaves walking around and shopping, there were sculptors sculpting with great pleasure. List one effect greece's geograhy had on food ancient greeks ate did all greek city-states have the same language and religion yes did all city-states have the same form of government no were athens and sparta the two most powerful city-states yes who established territories along the seacoasts. Athens and sparta are often considered two of the most, if not the most, influential of the ancient greek civilization their progress in philosophy, literature and warfare would come to shape much of our idea of ancient greece there is no doubt that these civilizations were very influential.

The athens city-state also has the highest percentage of greece's educational institutions, research centers and technological centers moreover, this region of greece has the nation's largest airport. During this time, athens and sparta became the two most powerful city-states athens was located in attica and it was the most populous it is known as the birthplace of democracy and was ruled by elected magistrates, the council of 500, and the assembly. Historically one of the two most powerful and influential of the classical greek city-states, sparta occupied a position of military and cultural dominance in pre-roman greece matched only by that.

P o l i s : p o l i s athens and sparta were probably the two most famous and powerful city states in ancient greece athens sparta however, they were both very different. Athens and sparta were the two major city-states during the ancient greece time period these two city-states were very different from each other in many ways one reason for this was because the city-states were separated from each other by low rugged mountains. Ancient greece - a mediterranean country - was divided into several territories known as city-states each city-state had its own rulers and developed its own culture two of the most important and powerful city-states were athens and sparta.

Himself an athenian general who served in the war, thucydides relates the invasions, treacheries, plagues, amazing speeches, ambitions, virtues, and emotions of the conflict between two of greece's most dominant city-states in a work that has the feel of a tragic drama. Athens and sparta, both powerful greek city-states, had fought as allies in the greco-persian wars between 499 and 449 bc in the wake of the persian retreat, however, athens grew more powerful.

Athens and sparta were the two most powerful city-states of ancient greece although there were obvious similarities in these two city-states, athens and sparta had distinct differences in every aspect of society. Of the many greek city-states, two of the most powerful were sparta and athens, which competed to be the dominant power known as the hegemon this was not an official position, and a city-state. For most of their histories, these two city-states were bitter rivals as you will see, the major differences between athens and sparta were reflected in almost every part of life. Athens and sparta comparison athens and sparta athens and sparta were the two largest greek city-states of the ancient world they were the biggest of rivals, two towering cities at their peak, the most influential cultural, military, and trade powers of western civilization in the first millennium bc.

an introduction and a comparison of the two most dominating city states in greece athens and sparta The city-states which sided with sparta increasingly perceived athens as a bully and a tyrant, while those cities which sided with athens viewed sparta and her allies with growing distrust the tension between these two parties eventually erupted in what has become known as the peloponnesian wars. an introduction and a comparison of the two most dominating city states in greece athens and sparta The city-states which sided with sparta increasingly perceived athens as a bully and a tyrant, while those cities which sided with athens viewed sparta and her allies with growing distrust the tension between these two parties eventually erupted in what has become known as the peloponnesian wars.
An introduction and a comparison of the two most dominating city states in greece athens and sparta
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